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Iran's Rial to a Record Low

Published on 8 February 2017 in News - Pages by Raffick Marday

Iran's Rial Crashes

New Wave of Trump Worries Drive Iran's Rial to a Record Low

As the country's ability to attract foreign money after Trump's swearing-in faces wide-ranging concerns, Iran's Rial has hit an all-time low across the globe. As the president-elect's inaugural ceremony inches closer day after day, revered fiscal opinion makers continue to foretell a gloomy future for the Asian nation's depreciating currency.

Donald Trump has reprieved mixed reactions regarding his inextricably controversial executive policy toward Iran and its internationally divisive nuclear endeavours.

As a result of the World Super Power's newly elected commander-in-chief's haphazard remarks that plunged Mexico and other nations into murky financial hurdles, the ailing Rial pared dismally against the US dollar on Monday.

Stock experts view the latest worsening of the embattled currency's standing as a harbinger portending an even sharp decline in the few weeks to come. Free market quotes placed Iran's devalued cash 41,500 in the last 48 hours transactions.

Having decreased markedly from an optimistic showing of 37,570 some time back in September this year, scores of monetary prognosticators cite a further low as America nears the 20th January official coronation of Donald Trump.

This new wave of unhealthy speculations has already started driving the weakening Rial beyond the 46,000th Marks if unconfirmed stock whispers coming from several blue-chip circles are anything to go by.

Native corporate insights confessed that because of this endless slew of destructive forces have something to do with Trump's November 8th election. Among his campaign and post-election policies, the divisive politician mentioned his intentions to invalidate a much-publicized deal between Iran and key world powers that gave the aggressive Muslim country a conditional leeway to carry on its extensively criticised nuclear armament.

Fears of a resurgence of the time-old sanctions that plagued Iran's economy for countless decades have recently resurfaced, leading to a spiralling Rial plus a host of other discouraging economic aftershocks.

Although credible think tanks have consisted presaged a more lenient Washington approach, this supposedly mitigating line of thought hasn't occasioned a corresponding setup. Analysts have in the past few weeks expressed hope that the most probable diplomatic path would be a re-enforcement of more stringent sanctions, rather than outright reneging on the existing pact.

Nonetheless, major corporations can't gamble on a seemingly perilous investment path - they've already shown a worry reluctance to trade with or pitch tent in the trouble-buffeted Asian country.

Bijan Bidabad, a widely reckoned Tehran economist, and scholar expressed justifiable pessimism two days ago. According to the first-rate investment guru, cash inflow figures have constantly relied upon the Iranian government's naturally hopeful anticipations after signing the epoch-making treaty.

In a comprehensive telephone interview with Reuters and other authoritative news powerhouses, Bidabad frankly admitted that the nation was writhing under a series of negative shifts due to Trump's bold, yet awfully venomous latest assertions on the country's largely sketchy nuclear plan.

As the depreciating Rial continued to ungracefully bear the brunt of the present fiscal turmoil, a line of indigenous pro-growth measures caused an influx of local currency across the nation. However, with the absence of foreign monies evidently thwarted any meaningful gains the internal upsurge was meant to avail, Bidabad elucidated.

Regardless of this sour turn of events, adamant officials at the government finance department have comparatively allayed any significant relation between the current plummeting and Trump's poisonous rhetoric about Iran and its suspicious nuclear activities.

In a defensive rejoinder to quell the building monetary tensions, Mr Bager Nobakht - the government spokesman, blamed a few "psychological issues" for the steady and future-damaging Rial devaluation. The official indistinctly supplied a few reversing policies that Iran hoped to employ in its fight against the latest fiscal onslaught.

Summarily, the spokesman said that the executive looked forward to seeing a fast rebound in a matter of few weeks, following the implementation of some supposedly effective counteractive strategies.

Observers see the growing currency crisis as a major campaign issue in the forthcoming presidential elections in Iran. The incumbents have thus lightly tackled the money hurdles by sticking to an extremely unreasonable official exchange rates of 32,317.

These falsely promising figures haven't however lessened the dismal free market rates that are set to surpass 46,000 in the intervening days pending the official inauguration of Iran's radically emboldened nemesis on 20th January the coming year - Iran's Rial-squeezing Donald J. Trump.

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